Xing Lin '13

Xing Lin '13

Harvard College ’13 (Currier House)
A.B., East Asian Studies

Xing Lin chose to concentrate in East Asian Studies out of an interest in international business, particularly between the U.S. and Asia. Grateful for the many outlets Harvard provided to pursue this area of study, Xing took advantage of both EAS classes and those offered by the Economics department as an undergraduate. When the time came during sophomore year to decide on a concentration, he remembers the choice being easy. The small size of EAS classes, which allowed for interactive discussions with professors and peers, the study and work abroad opportunities available to EAS concentrators, and, most importantly, the eagerness in which teaching assistants, professors, and faculty offered mentorship to concentrators were reasons enough to persuade Xing to choose EAS. During his 4 years as an undergrad, he received the opportunity to study abroad in Japan and China and to work abroad in South Korea, all while receiving direct mentorship from top scholars in the field.

After college, Xing moved across the country to start a career at Dropbox, a technology company headquartered in San Francisco, California. The research, language, and critical thinking skills he developed as an EAS concentrator have since proved to be huge assets to the work he does on a daily basis. Six months after starting at Dropbox, Xing received the opportunity to help expand the company into the Asia Pacific region. Despite having just moved to San Francisco, he soon found himself on a one year adventure to open offices in Sydney and Tokyo. While abroad, Xing often referred back to his former international experiences and his EAS classes to apply what he learned towards the business strategies he was developing for the new Dropbox offices. He notes that it has been really interesting to witness how a country’s culture and history affects its domestic and international business practices.

Xing firmly believes that, though Harvard provides its students with many resources to pursue and engage with research beyond the classroom, concentrating in a field that is personally interesting helps create a remarkable undergraduate experience. He feels very fortunate to not only have received abundant resources to travel, study and work internationally as an undergraduate, but also very lucky to have a career where he can continue to use what he’s studied on a daily basis. Reflecting back on his undergraduate years, Xing’s only regret is not having taken more EAS classes. But there’s always graduate school!